Translations

Im Leitila? (2015 Philipp Winterberg)

Im Leitila_NEWA translation of Philipp Winterberg’s children’s book Bin Ich Klein? into the Gothic language, illustrated by Nadja Wichmann, co-translated by Hroþiland Bairhteins (alias).

“Am I big? Am I small?” That depends on who you ask, doesn’t it?

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Agjabairhts Wairþiþ Rauþs
(2015 Philipp Winterberg)

Agjabairhts_NEWA translation of Philipp Winterberg’s children’s book Egbert Wird Rot into the Gothic language, co-translated by Hroþiland Bairhteins (alias).

‘To bully or not to bully,’ that is the question, at least for Egbert.

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Hnibilugge Spill (in progress)

hnibiluggespillA prose translation of Das Nibelungenlied into the Gothic language, a long-term project, not likely to be finished for several years yet.

Here’s an excerpt (1.15-18) with a close English translation:

15 “Du hwe wair qiþis mis, aiþei meina waliso? Ni hwanhun wiljau wairis frijaþwa haban. Swa skauns wiljau wisan und dauþu jah ni hwanhun aiw nauþ frijaþwos gawinnan wairis.”
16 “Nu ni uskius þo swa usdaudo!” andwaurdida þan so aiþei. “Jabai in þizai manasedai sunjaba faginon skalt, þata wairþiþ af wairis frijaþwai. Skauns qino wairþis jabai fragibiþ þus nauh Guþ wair filu godana.”
17 “Ni þana seiþs rodjaima bi þata,” qaþ so magaþs. “Qinom managaim gabairhtjada ufta hwaiwa und andi frijaþwa saurgai fragildada. Bajoþs biwandja ik ei ni wairþai mis ubil.”
18 Greimahildi in ahin afwandida allis af frijaþwai, jah afar þata so godo habaida managans dagans galeikaidans, ni ainnohun kunnandei þanei wildedi frijon.

15 “Why do you speak to me of a man, mother dear? Never do I wish to have the love of a man. Thus fair, I wish to be until death and never ever suffer the trouble of a man’s love.”
16 “Now do not cast it aside so keenly!” answered then the mother. “If you are ever to be truly happy in this world, that will come of a man’s love. A fair woman you will be if God yet grants you a very good man.”
17 “Let us speak no more of this,” said the maiden. “To many a woman it has often been made clear how in the end love is repaid with sorrow. Both will I shun so that no ill befall me.”
18 In her mind Kriemhild wholly turned away from love, and afterwards the good maiden had many a pleasant day, knowing no-one whom she might want to love.